Aside

Lilies and Lavender flower farm featured in new book.

24 Feb
Lilies and Lavender, locally grown flowers, bucks county flower farm. sustainably grown flowers, philadelphia  local flower farm,

Bridal Bouquet with Black Out Lilies, Bridesmaids with white Calla Lilies

 

locally grown flowers, lilies and lavender, sustainably grown flowers, philadelphia local flower farm, bucks county flower farm

Samantha with our first dahlia of the season

Lilies and Lavender, locally grown flowers, bucks county flower farm. sustainably grown flowers, philadelphia local flower farm,

Gaillardia

Lilies and Lavender, locally grown flowers, bucks county flower farm. sustainably grown flowers, philadelphia  local flower farm,

Sweet William in the field

Lilies and Lavender, locally grown flowers, bucks county flower farm. sustainably grown flowers, philadelphia  local flower farm,

Rudbeckia

Lilies and Lavender, locally grown flowers, bucks county flower farm. sustainably grown flowers, philadelphia  local flower farm,

Oriental Lily Sanna

Lilies and Lavender, locally grown flowers, bucks county flower farm. sustainably grown flowers, philadelphia  local flower farm,

Romantic Bouquet with Peonies and Ranunculus

Spring wedding

Spring wedding

lilies and lavender, locally grown flowers, sustainably grown flowers, Bucks county flower farm

Spring centerpiece with peonies and viburnum

Lilies and Lavender, locally grown flowers, bucks county flower farm. sustainably grown flowers, philadelphia  local flower farm,

Spring centerpiece with locally grown peonies, ranunculus and viburnum

Lilies and Lavender, locally grown flowers, bucks county flower farm. sustainably grown flowers, philadelphia  local flower farm,

Bridal Bouquet with locally grown Peonies, Ranunculus and Poppies

Lilies and Lavender, locally grown flowers, bucks county flower farm. sustainably grown flowers, philadelphia  local flower farm,

Purple dahlia at Lilies and Lavender flower farm

Lilies and Lavender, locally grown flowers, bucks county flower farm. sustainably grown flowers, philadelphia  local flower farm,

Kate and April harvesting gomphrena

Lilies and Lavender, locally grown flowers, bucks county flower farm. sustainably grown flowers, philadelphia  local flower farm,

Kate with Acidanthera and sunflowers

locally grown flowers, sustainably grown flowers, flower farm, Philadelphai local flower farm

Lilies and Lavender, Bucks County, PA flower farm

20110824_0184

Lilies and Lavender, locally grown flowers, bucks county flower farm. sustainably grown flowers, philadelphia  local flower farm,

Zinnia in the field at Lilies and Lavender flower farm

Lilies and Lavender, locally grown flowers, bucks county flower farm. sustainably grown flowers, philadelphia  local flower farm,

Kat harvesting French Tulips at Lilies and Lavender Flower Farm

Brides say “I Do” to locally grown flowers

New book showcasing seasonal blooms in bridal bouquets

features Doylestown-area flower farm

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 02/21/2014 CONTACT:  Kate Sparks, Lilies and Lavender             215-345-7282    kate@liliesandlavender.com

http://www.liliesandlavender.com

Lilies and Lavender, Doylestown, PA—  When Kelly Doyle walks down the aisle this May, she’ll be clutching a beautiful bouquet of fresh flowers in a white and blush color palette—a hot hue trending for area weddings.  But rather than opting for a staid spray of imported blush roses, Doyle will be holding a beautiful, garden style bouquet featuring locally-grown peonies, poppies and bleeding hearts accented with vining deutzia.

The seasonal flowers will be grown and designed by Lilies and Lavender, a flower farm located in Bucks County.  Lilies and Lavender, a sustainably managed flower farm established in 1998 is the only farm in Bucks County exclusively growing ornamentals.  Lilies and Lavender grows new, heirloom and unusual varieties of flowers and specializes in Full Service and Design It Yourself Weddings.  A new book, Fresh from the Field Wedding Flowers highlights the growing local flower movement and includes dozens of photos of wedding bouquets made with seasonal, locally-grown flowers– including several arrangements by Lilies and Lavender.  The book celebrates the beauty of seasonal and sustainable flowers.  From heirloom narcissus, columbine, ranunculus and frilly French tulips in the spring to dramatic café au lait dahlias paired with berries and dark ninebark foliage in the fall, the bouquets showcase the floral bounty of each season.

Some credit the red-hot local foods movement for the increasing interest in local, seasonal flowers.  Others point to high-end designers and trend-setters that are increasingly incorporating local flowers in their floral designs. The Association of Specialty Cut Flower Growers has noted a decisive uptick in membership over the course of the past two years, as new flower farms take root and established farms convert a portion of their land to flower production.

Conscientious consumers are increasingly aware of where and how the products they buy are produced.  For brides, using local flowers is a way to make their weddings distinct, different and more meaningful.    “I love the fact that I know exactly where my flowers came from” states Kelly Doyle.

Design It Yourself brides seeking to further personalize their big day are making their own bouquets and boutonnieres using local flowers.  Fresh from the Field Wedding Flowers offers step-by-step instruction on how to take a bucket of farm fresh flowers and create magazine-worthy floral designs.  A bonus DVD included with the book includes 75-minutes of detailed instruction by Erin Benzakein, one of the nation’s foremost “farmer florists”—a term used to describe a growing group of entrepreneurs who are both flower farmers and floral designers.

“We want to give people skills to promote and use local flowers” states Lynn Byczynski, a Kansas-based flower farmer and co-author of the book.  “Weddings are one great opportunity to use seasonal flowers and Fresh from the Field showcases the beauty of local flowers from farms like Lilies and Lavender.”

“Sustainably grown, local and seasonal flowers are much better for the environment than flowers shipped from overseas. By choosing locally grown flowers brides are contributing to the revival of  American Floriculture and helping to keep local farms viable,” states  Kate Sparks of Lilies and Lavender.

Most flowers sold in the U.S. are imported, primarily from Colombia and Ecuador.

“While there are lots of social, economic and environmental reasons to buy locally-grown flowers, our clients are simply blown away by the beauty of seasonal flowers,” Sparks shared.  “Plus they love the fact that our flowers are so different than anything they can buy at a traditional florist or big box store.”

When Sellersville, PA resident  Arielle Colmaire married Alex Fera last May, she carried a romantic bouquet of coral peonies, peach and yellow ranunculus, sweetly scented stock and babys breath designed by Lilies and Lavender.  When asked if she would recommend using local flowers to other brides, Fera enthusiastically replied, “I do.”

—30—

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

For contact information for the brides quoted above or to use high quality, high resolution photos of flowers or bridal bouquets, contact Lilies and Lavender at: 215-345-7282 or kate@liliesandlavender.com

For additional information about Lilies and Lavender go to:  http://www.liliesandlavender.com

Fresh from the Field Wedding Flowers can be ordered at: www.freshfromthefieldweddings.com Image

Advertisements
Aside

Lilies and Lavender featured in new book

24 Feb

Brides say “I Do” to locally grown flowers

New book showcasing seasonal blooms in bridal bouquets 

features Doylestown-area flower farm

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 02/21/2014 CONTACT:  Kate Sparks, Lilies and Lavender             215-345-7282    kate@liliesandlavender.com

http://www.liliesandlavender.com

 

Lilies and Lavender, Doylestown, PA—  When Kelly Doyle walks down the aisle this May, she’ll be clutching a beautiful bouquet of fresh flowers in a white and blush color palette—a hot hue trending for area weddings.  But rather than opting for a staid spray of imported blush roses, Doyle will be holding a beautiful, garden style bouquet featuring locally-grown peonies, poppies and bleeding hearts accented with vining deutzia.

The seasonal flowers will be grown and designed by Lilies and Lavender, a flower farm located in Bucks County.  Lilies and Lavender, a sustainably managed flower farm established in 1998 is the only farm in Bucks County exclusively growing ornamentals.  Lilies and Lavender grows new, heirloom and unusual varieties of flowers and specializes in Full Service and Design It Yourself Weddings.  A new book, Fresh from the Field Wedding Flowers highlights the growing local flower movement and includes dozens of photos of wedding bouquets made with seasonal, locally-grown flowers– including several arrangements by Lilies and Lavender.  The book celebrates the beauty of seasonal and sustainable flowers.  From heirloom narcissus, columbine, ranunculus and frilly French tulips in the spring to dramatic café au lait dahlias paired with berries and dark ninebark foliage in the fall, the bouquets showcase the floral bounty of each season.  

Some credit the red-hot local foods movement for the increasing interest in local, seasonal flowers.  Others point to high-end designers and trend-setters that are increasingly incorporating local flowers in their floral designs. The Association of Specialty Cut Flower Growers has noted a decisive uptick in membership over the course of the past two years, as new flower farms take root and established farms convert a portion of their land to flower production.  

Conscientious consumers are increasingly aware of where and how the products they buy are produced.  For brides, using local flowers is a way to make their weddings distinct, different and more meaningful.    “I love the fact that I know exactly where my flowers came from” states Kelly Doyle. 

Design It Yourself brides seeking to further personalize their big day are making their own bouquets and boutonnieres using local flowers.  Fresh from the Field Wedding Flowers offers step-by-step instruction on how to take a bucket of farm fresh flowers and create magazine-worthy floral designs.  A bonus DVD included with the book includes 75-minutes of detailed instruction by Erin Benzakein, one of the nation’s foremost “farmer florists”—a term used to describe a growing group of entrepreneurs who are both flower farmers and floral designers.  

“We want to give people skills to promote and use local flowers” states Lynn Byczynski, a Kansas-based flower farmer and co-author of the book.  “Weddings are one great opportunity to use seasonal flowers and Fresh from the Field showcases the beauty of local flowers from farms like Lilies and Lavender.”     

“Sustainably grown, local and seasonal flowers are much better for the environment than flowers shipped from overseas. By choosing locally grown flowers brides are contributing to the revival of  American Floriculture and helping to keep local farms viable,” states  Kate Sparks of Lilies and Lavender.

Most flowers sold in the U.S. are imported, primarily from Colombia and Ecuador.  

“While there are lots of social, economic and environmental reasons to buy locally-grown flowers, our clients are simply blown away by the beauty of seasonal flowers,” Sparks shared.  “Plus they love the fact that our flowers are so different than anything they can buy at a traditional florist or big box store.”

When Sellersville, PA resident  Arielle Colmaire married Alex Fera last May, she carried a romantic bouquet of coral peonies, peach and yellow ranunculus, sweetly scented stock and babys breath designed by Lilies and Lavender.  When asked if she would recommend using local flowers to other brides, Fera enthusiastically replied, “I do.”  

—30—

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

For contact information for the brides quoted above or to use high quality, high resolution photos of flowers or bridal bouquets, contact Lilies and Lavender at: 215-345-7282 or kate@liliesandlavender.com

For additional information about Lilies and Lavender go to:  http://www.liliesandlavender.com 

Fresh from the Field Wedding Flowers can be ordered at: www.freshfromthefieldweddings.com 

May, my busiest month

22 May

What happened to getting married in June?  My busiest month for weddings is May.  It’s also when most of my annuals and summer bulbs get planted.  Spring is my very favorite season but oy what a workload!  Last week I removed landscape fabric from my fields, spread maunure, (always fun), tilled, put the landscape fabric back on, planted thousands of seedlings and put in irrigations lines.  I also delivered flowers for two weddings, harvested flowers for two farmers’ markets and sold flowers at the Market at the Fareway in Chestnut Hill.  Today, Sunday, I took a nap!  Next Sunday is mother’s day, enough said. I have more annuals to plant and lots of summer bulbs too.  I’m so lucky to have a great intern, Kathleen Claar, this year who has had to work by herself while I run around like a maniac trying to keep everything organized and on schedule. The weather has been wonderful too.  Sunny but not hot.  Rain just after my first planting.  What more could a flower farmer ask for?  Maybe another nap?  Beautiful summer flowers will be a great reward for all the hard work.  In the meantime I can enjoy the french tulips Kat and I harvested. I hope my brides will enjoy them too.Image

Image

Freshly harvested french tulips

22 May

Freshly harvested french tulips

Aside

Lilies and Lavender locally grown flowers and floral designs featured in the Knot Pennsylvania, Spring/Summer 2013

27 Nov

11/27/2012 8:10am
Subject:Lilies and Lavender flowers featured in the Knot wedding magazine
# of Recipients:41
Text:

I was very excited when my friend Janine called  to say Lilies and Lavender’s locally grown flowers and designs were featured in the Knot!  Megan and Jeff’s beautiful Reading Art Works wedding is featured in the spring-summer 2013 Knot magazine with a beautiful 5-page spread. Woohoo! (In case you missed Megan + Jeff’s feature on Style Me Pretty, check it out for the whole wedding!

The photos by Lauren Fair photography are gorgeous and I think the flowers are too. I spent three days filling 350 jars and bottles with farm fresh ranunculus, viburnum, lilies, hydrangea, baby’s breath, godetia and whatever else was blooming in the bride’s colors.  Megan, the wonderful, very artistic bride wanted a bouquet that reflected the season, in colors of coral, tangerine, buttercream and soft white. Since she came to me six months before the wedding I was able to grow lots of flowers in several shades of coral, peach and  soft yellow. Which also proved very popular with all my spring weddings.   Megan and Jeff came to the farm a week before the wedding toLilies and Lavender flowers featured in the Knot Spring/Summer 2013make their final choice of flowers. The final selection of flowers, where I get to show off all the beauties, and point out some creative uses for more unusual specimens,  is one of my favorite parts of wedding work.  Megan loved the silvery grey cardoon leaves which I think soften the bouquet and make it unique.  Since I only had white and pink peonies I traded  another local grower a bunch of  lilies for coral peonies Voila! The result is a bouquet which is vibrant but also soft, loose and natural.

Be sure to pick up the magazine when it comes out on the news stands. I especially love  Megan’s designs for the chandeliers, which add a wonderful, soft romantic touch to the big loft space at the Reading Art Works.

If you would like to see more photos of Lilies and Lavender designs you can visit my website: www.liiesandlavender.com

Hello world!

21 Nov

In this new blog I will be writing about all the happenings, good, bad and comical  at Lilies and Lavender flower farm and design studio.  Future blogs will be coming soon! In the meantime check out my website at www.liliesandlavender.com